Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press

Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press Standards

Measured in kg

Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press strength standards help you to compare your one-rep max lift with other lifters at your bodyweight.

Our community Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press standards are based on 257,795 lifts by Strength Level users

Male Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press Standards (kg)

Entire Community

Strength LevelWeight
Beginner13 kg
Novice21 kg
Intermediate31 kg
Advanced44 kg
Elite59 kg

How much should I be able to Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press? (kg)

What is the average Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press? The average Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press weight for a male lifter is 31 kg (1RM). This makes you Intermediate on Strength Level and is a very impressive lift.

What is a good Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press? Male beginners should aim to lift 13 kg (1RM) which is still impressive compared to the general population.

Dumbbell weights are for one dumbbell and include the weight of the bar, normally 2 kg / 4.4 lb

By Weight and Age

BWBeg.Nov.Int.Adv.Elite
50611182738
55713213041
60915233345
651017263648
701219283951
751321304254
801522324457
851624354760
901726374963
951928395266
1002029415468
1052231435671
1102333455873
1152434466076
1202636486278
1252737506480
1302839526682
1352940536884
1403142557086

How many sets and reps of Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press should I do?

These are the most popular Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press workouts done by male lifters:

3x10 19%
3x12 11%
3x8 11%
4x10 7%
4x12 5%

Calculate Your Strength Level

kg
kg
years old

Create Standards

Rate Your Lifts Against Other People

The Strength Level Calculator can show your exact level of strength at any bodyweight.

Calculate Your Strength

What do the strength standards mean?

Beginner Stronger than 5% of lifters. A beginner lifter can perform the movement correctly and has practiced it for at least a month.
Novice Stronger than 20% of lifters. A novice lifter has trained regularly in the technique for at least six months.
Intermediate Stronger than 50% of lifters. An intermediate lifter has trained regularly in the technique for at least two years.
Advanced Stronger than 80% of lifters. An advanced lifter has progressed for over five years.
Elite Stronger than 95% of lifters. An elite lifter has dedicated over five years to become competitive at strength sports.