Dumbbell Floor Press

Dumbbell Floor Press Standards

Measured in lb

Dumbbell Floor Press strength standards help you to compare your one-rep max lift with other lifters at your bodyweight.

Our community Dumbbell Floor Press standards are based on 108,887 lifts by Strength Level users
Dumbbell Floor Press

Male Dumbbell Floor Press Standards (lb)

Entire Community

Strength LevelWeight
Beginner32 lb
Novice53 lb
Intermediate80 lb
Advanced114 lb
Elite151 lb

How much should I be able to Dumbbell Floor Press? (lb)

What is the average Dumbbell Floor Press? The average Dumbbell Floor Press weight for a male lifter is 80 lb (1RM). This makes you Intermediate on Strength Level and is a very impressive lift.

What is a good Dumbbell Floor Press? Male beginners should aim to lift 32 lb (1RM) which is still impressive compared to the general population.

Dumbbell weights are for one dumbbell and include the weight of the bar, normally 2 kg / 4.4 lb

By Weight and Age

BWBeg.Nov.Int.Adv.Elite
1101529487299
12019335479107
13022385985115
14025426592122
15029477098129
160325175104136
170355580110143
180385985115149
190426389121155
200456694126161
210487098131167
2205174103136173
2305477107141178
2405781111146184
2506084115151189
2606288119155194
2706591123159199
2806894127164203
2907198130168208
30073101134172213
31076104137176217

How many sets and reps of Dumbbell Floor Press should I do?

These are the most popular Dumbbell Floor Press workouts done by male lifters:

3x10 13%
3x12 10%
4x12 8%
3x8 7%
4x10 6%

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What do the strength standards mean?

Beginner Stronger than 5% of lifters. A beginner lifter can perform the movement correctly and has practiced it for at least a month.
Novice Stronger than 20% of lifters. A novice lifter has trained regularly in the technique for at least six months.
Intermediate Stronger than 50% of lifters. An intermediate lifter has trained regularly in the technique for at least two years.
Advanced Stronger than 80% of lifters. An advanced lifter has progressed for over five years.
Elite Stronger than 95% of lifters. An elite lifter has dedicated over five years to become competitive at strength sports.